Why sales doesn’t understand partnerships.

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Photo by LinkedIn Sales Navigator on Unsplash

Everyone is in sales. Maybe that’s the challenging part about being in the field. If you’re not selling a car or a service you are selling yourself to your family (No, you’ll never be good enough) or, harder, your new partner (Good luck. He’s how old?). If every person is in a constant state of pitching, that also means that every person is also constantly being pitched to. What can we assess from this? There’s a lot of people doing the same thing taking up a lot of time. Not just taking up a lot of time, wasting a lot of time. It’s as meaningless as throwing paint at a wall and hoping it sticks. Sure, some of the paint will hold just as some of your sales will come to fruition. But, if there’s no intention behind what you are doing are you really getting as much as you can out of it? For consistencies sake, wouldn’t you rather paint the entire wall with the same amount of effort as slinging? Or, if you’re making 17%, wouldn’t you rather it be on $50K instead of $5k? Naturally, the answer is $50K, but there are some concepts that the everyday salesperson doesn’t understand. The best salespeople take the Mark Miller approach. …


How my efforts for an interview can teach you the true value of your professional ecosystem and how to utilize it.

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Photo by Product School on Unsplash

I recently found myself with an incredible opportunity. An interview with a startup in the city I wanted to live in. The interview included a case study that required my understanding of people holding positions I’ve never held, in a field I am far from familiar with. To gain insight, I turned to Linkedin. I sent invitations to 100 people who met the minimal criteria. Most of these invitations were accepted. To each person, I sent a message explaining my situation and requesting that they allow me to ask them 5 questions so that I could gain some direction for this project. Not one responded. The lack of response isn’t something new to me. I’ve worked in sales before. Specifically, in the beer industry in Georgia. …


I’ve decided to go in a different direction. I wish you well in your future endeavors and appreciate the time you’ve contributed

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Photo by Bermix Studio on Unsplash

Dear Imposter Syndrome,

I hear your message of impossibility, and ultimately I respect your perspective. How could I possibly have these opportunities and see them to their fruition? It is by no means a reflection of experience or capabilities that allowed this window to open for me. Or that’s what you would lead me to believe. Who am I, you scream so loudly, to become more? Who am I to even try? I should stay in my box. I am safe in its limitations. I am comforted by its restrictions. …


How I found salvation after abusing substances, my partners, and myself.

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Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

I am constantly trying to improve myself. Sometimes, it’s from a good place of trying to be a better, more compassionate, loving human being. Normally, it’s perfectionism. American culture embraces perfectionism and loops it into our relentless work ethic and hunt for the American dream. Only until recently, I learned that perfectionism is actually a symptom of trauma. It manifests in people who have experienced a variety of circumstances, including being a child of addicts, partners of abuse, and loved ones of bipolar & borderline personality disorder. I happen to be all three- plus some. I have and continue too, spend a lot of time, money, and energy addressing this symptom. …


3 things I learned from our 10 life-altering months together.

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Photo by Samuele Giglio on Unsplash

I decided to take a hiatus from alcohol on October 16th, 2019. I published my first article on Medium October 29th of the same year.

My dive into sobriety was intended to last a week. Feeling the ease with which I did it, I thought I’d see how long I could continue. A month into it, I realized that alcohol had been a part of every experience of my life. I recognized fear of being excluded and concern about not being able to be “myself” without it. Having committed earlier in the year to do the things I was afraid of, I thought, “Why not?” …


4 steps to correct what you did so that you can move on.

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Photo by Sarah Kilian on Unsplash

Mistakes were made today. Several actually, and that happens. Immediately, my thoughts went to self-judgment. You’re such a fuck up. Why can’t you get it together, Taylor? But then I remembered, I’m human, and I make mistakes.

I make mistakes a lot when I think about it. I eat foods that I know hurt my stomach. I’ve dated the wrong people. Stayed in relationships longer than I should have. Tried to do the same thing the same way, expecting different results with different scenarios. Lots of mistakes. …


I’ve got 99, but a bitch ain’t one.

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Photo by Oleg Ivanov on Unsplash

I just finished reading an article by Austin Birch. He says for a business to be problem-driven. That it keeps the company on the offensive and allows the business to cater to a specific niche.

I’m having some issues with my niche.

I serve women who want to quit being drunken shit shows and start actually living a life they enjoy.

I’ve been raised around alcoholism my entire life, just generations of alcohol diluted blood flowing through my veins. Immediately in my bloodline, I have one parent in denial and the other in a cancer forced recovery. …


Experiencing abuse allowed me to recognize my own abusive patterns.

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Photo by Sydney Sims on Unsplash

Psychology says we replicate the relationships the way that we’re shown as children. The relationship that was demonstrated for me as a child was wild and angry. My parents were tormented by their unresolved demons from their childhood and so tormented each other. As a child, I vowed to never be this way. I broke my vow time and time again. .

In my 18th year, I began creating conflict in my relationships. Not just with my boyfriend, but with my friends. I was competitive, insecure, and dramatic. Unknowingly, I positioned myself for conflict. …


White privilege in the state of Georgia serves no one. Not even the white people.

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Photo by Sara Cervera on Unsplash

As any white person in 2020, I am struggling with the realities of my white privilege. I’ve had many experiences in which I knew I was benefitting from the way I looked the moment they happened. Always, I attributed them to my being a woman with certain physical qualities that the men I encountered found desirable. Never, did I consider that the color of my skin having any impact. In my sobriety, I find myself reflecting on moments questioning my lack of repercussion for my behaviors. That’s not to say I didn’t. I lost a lot. Friends, jobs, respect. …


How the pandemic brought out my worst enemy, myself.

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Photo by Brett Jordan on Unsplash

2019 was a wet dream in comparison to 2018 and 2020. 2018 was filled with turmoil, heartbreak, and growing pains. 2019 was my flourishing from all of the wreckage. I found spirituality, I found my calling, I found sobriety, and, I thought, I found myself.

“I wasted 5 years of my life with someone who wouldn’t change, and I’m not doing it with you.” But the “you” was directed at the wrong person. The you was me.

At the end of 2019, I also found a partner. Totally unlike anyone I ever dated, I was in awe of him. Tall, dark, handsome, insightful. On paper, he was everything I’d dreamed of in a partner. Quite literally, I have a page in my journal from October of 2019 describing my ideal partner’s qualities. He matches every single one. The version of myself then paired beautifully with those qualities. Uncontrolling, free-spirited, uplifted. …

About

TaylorRuth

Contributing writer to Recovery International, The Ascend, and Innovation. As seen in Are We Europe, & Culture Trip. Sober Party Girl : livingwanderfull.com

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